Keeping your furry friend indoors is great for a lot of reasons (safety and health, to name two), but did you know even indoor kitties can get fleas? And one adult female flea can lay 50 eggs each day! Take action to keep these little buggers outside where they belong.

HOW DO INDOOR-ONLY CATS GET FLEAS?

There are several ways fleas can make their way to your indoor kitties:

Do you have other pets that go outside? A flea can hitch a ride on the family dog, even if you use a flea prevention product on him or her. That’s because most flea prevention products actually take time to kill the fleas, leaving a window for the fleas to lay eggs before dying. If you live in a rural area, where fleas exist in greater numbers, your indoor kitty is even more at risk.

Do YOU go outside? Fleas can also tag along on pants and shoes. Even if you take off your shoes when you first enter your house, fleas could be hopping off your pants in every room.

Did you recently move to a new home? Fleas can lie dormant for months. So it’s possible the fleas have been looming in your new place, just waiting for an unsuspecting kitty of their own.

Do you take your indoor-only cat on walks outside or let them on your porch or deck? If so, it’s possible for your kitty to pick up a flea or two there.

HOW DO I PREVENT FLEAS IN INDOOR-ONLY KITTIES?

Not surprisingly, the top answer is the same as for outdoor cats: monthly flea prevention. There are lots of options on the market, and your vet can help you choose one that works best for you, your furball and your home.

Next, vacuum your carpet and furniture often. This will help get rid of any eggs before they hatch. Daily is best, if you can make the time.

Finally, comb your cat with a flea comb regularly. Fleas are tiny, but you can catch them in the comb or see them jumping in the fur. Eggs are little white dots that can be caught in the comb. By doing this on a regular basis, you can catch fleas before they become an infestation.

Like with most things, prevention is much easier than dealing with the consequences. A few steps now can keep your indoor kitties (and your home) flee-free. And that will give your furry friend something to purr about.

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